Monday, October 02, 2006

Before the flood of car photos...

...which I'm still sorting through, here are a few related (but somewhat random) pix and thoughts.

In the first two photos you can see perhaps half the cars that were entered in the show...



...spread out on a golf course which, along with the temperature and the cloud cover, contributed to the uncomfortable humidity...



It wasn't all that bad for those in casual attire, but the judges were more-or-less expected to wear blazers and ties. An odd thing, which I've noticed before, is that the wealthy -- and the eccentric -- can change dress "codes" to suit themselves. One judge, an artist, wore what appeared to be a Hawaiian shirt under a linen jacket, while a couple of the Old Money types who frequent events like this felt perfectly at ease in dress shirts, ties, shorts and sandals.

Be that as it may, I was guzzling water -- not "Hydration Fluid," I assure you -- and trying not to look as uncomfortable as I felt.

The proceedings were interrupted briefly while a P51 Mustang did a one-man airshow over the field...



A friend I saw there said "better you than me," and wasn't referring to my damp fancy duds. He understood that this judging business is a bit of a mug's game: not only does it involve basics such as cleanliness and how well the cars are restored or preserved, but deals with minute details of authenticity. For example: was a given part correct for the car, should it be painted, chrome or bare metal, did the 1951 version of a car being judged have the same wheels as the '52 model? It's all nit-picky stuff, but it matters to those whose cars are being judged. We had to get it right....

Fortunately, the two judges working with me were quite knowledgeable, and we reached agreement quickly. You can imagine the thoroughness of our inspections when I tell you it took us two hours to judge six cars.

I was happy to get it over with, and not just because I could then shed the jacket and tie. No, after that, I could walk around and meet friends, enjoy the cars I hadn't gone over in such minute detail (they were divided into roughly 20 different classes, based on age, type, country of origin, and so on) and take pictures.

And I must admit that, though I prefer original cars to the elaborate restorations that are so popular -- and bring so much money when the cars are sold!, repairing the ravages of age and applying a fresh, smooth finish allows one to see some exquisite details that are often not so apparent, such as the fine detailing of the woodwork on this '48 Chrysler Town & Country convertible....



More later....

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

There's something about restored wood, either in a house or even on a car or an old boat that provides comfort. The idea of looking at shined up wood may bore some people, but damnit, I'm the child of a designer and I was carefully taught to appreciate stuff like that. And I'm glad. -Lauren

MrScribbler said...

Lauren -- something I very much enjoy about being a judge at these shows is the opportunity to take an extra-close look at fine craftsmanship.

And yes, I react the same way to wooden houses, boats and furniture....

DAL said...

I enjoy things made of wood whatever way they are finished. Or not.

Imagine taking a car to a carpenter for repair...how zrwoh.

MrScribbler said...

dal -- and the carpenters charge like gygjum to make those wooden body parts look so nice.