Wednesday, December 22, 2010

Buried.

It has been a chilly, dark day here, entirely appropriate for finding an old prairie cemetery on my walking route.

That's not something you expect to see amid recently built industrial buildings (many now empty) and on the verge of a busy highway.

The cemetery was established in 1855 by Rev. George Blewett. His daughter, Anne, was the first to be buried there. In time, Rev. Blewett joined her there, as did other members of his family. His son -- grandson? -- was one of the last to be interred there, in 1919. Other families have gravesites within the simple iron fence as well.

Given the size of the fenced-off land, I have to assume many grave markers have vanished over the years. Were they stolen, or were there many wooden crosses and plaques that didn't withstand 90 years of neglect?

I felt transported far away from the busy area Where I Live Now. This is the kind of place one expects to stumble across when driving down a lonely back road, a place to be appreciated without traffic noises and other signs of modern life....


For once, I'm a bit sad that I don't use some tricky photo-manipulation program that would allow me to wipe away the trappings of civilization from the background. Buildings, cars and telephone wires have nothing to do with this place.

By the same token, I wish I had some idea of the stories entombed below the remaining headstones....

6 comments:

John0 Juanderlust said...

If I am able to read that correctly, aura was only 16. They married young. Hopefully they had not celebrated their tenth anniversary prior to her demise.
I see you choose rather grave topics for your art.

MrScribbler said...

Yes, Laura -- the "Wife at Rest" -- was just 16 when she departed this vale of tears. There must be a story behind that....

I've always been fascinated by marble orchards.

Doug said...

I took a shot at eliminating the vehicles and building from that shot. It's not bad if you squint, but I don't have the hand for doing something like that in high detail.

I have many cemeteries near me to photograph. Perhaps I should get back to a few of them.

wildstorm said...

Excellent subject matter--these old cemeteries. There are many shots in my archives but I never did anything with them. Thanks for the inspiration.

MrScribbler said...

Doug -- I tried the basic "art supplies" on my photo program. I learned two things: First, I ain't an artist. Second, in digital I can always save myself with the "delete" key.

Wildstorm -- I wanna see some! I'm sure you've been to the kind of cemeteries this one would be without the distracting surroundings. And you, of all people, would know how to make the great images....

Dorrie said...

now THAT'S a great subject! See, there is something interesting in your area. I love old cemetaries, too, and often wonder about the stories behind the graves.

In Germany, the graves get dug up after 30 years and re-used unless the original family continues to "pay rent"! We don't have the wide open spaces to keep them. Except Jewish cemetaries... they stay untouched!

Maybe you can ask at the city archives/historical society about those people... that would give you a great project to keep you busy.

P.S. thanks for being there for Betty...